Upcoming Events

Jun 01

Solar Imaging Workshop

June 1 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Jun 05

The Voice of Space by Marcus Chown

June 5 @ 6:30 pm - 9:30 pm
Jun 17

Trip to the National Space Centre in Leicester

June 17 @ 10:00 am - 5:00 pm

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To join the Flamsteed Astronomy Society, click on this link.

The Flamsteed is an amateur astronomy society at the Royal Observatory and National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, London SE10. It has around 350 members who represent the full range of interests and experience in astronomy. Many are beginners. It is named after the first Astronomer Royal, John Flamsteed.

The Society was founded in 1999, and is part of the membership organisation of Royal Museums Greenwich.

Our lecture meetings are held once a month between September/October and May/June, usually on a Monday evening, in the lecture theatre of the National Maritime Museum, or in the Peter Harrison Planetarium at the Royal Observatory Greenwich (ROG). The Society regularly holds observing evenings using members’ own telescopes.  In addition the Society stages viewing sessions with the ROG’s Great Equatorial Telescope, the largest of its kind in the UK, and seventh largest in the world.

We are an affiliated society of the British Astronomical Association and members of The Federation of Astronomical Societies.The Federation of Astronomical SocietiesBritish Astronomical Association

Bobby Manoo gave an excellent talk about “amazing astronomical alignments”. Bobby was inspired during a visit to Egypt when he saw the pyramids and especially the temple at Abu Simbel. He began with a short introduction to the equinoxes and solstices, and a look at the ‘analemma’ pattern traced out by the position of the […]

On Monday April 10, 2017 we had the pleasure of a visit to the NMM Caird Library to look at some of the terrific books, maps, and charts related (vaguely!) to astronomy.   Our visit was hosted by Louise Devoy (Curator of the ROG), Megan Barford (Curator of Cartography), and Gareth Bellis (Manager of the Library). […]

Dr Edward Yeadon

The talk to the History of Astronomy Group was a bit off-piste this time. As Eddie said in his introduction, it could be argued that the subject was neither history nor astronomy. But for a subject so central to modern astronomy any exception was well worthwhile. As well as capturing the public’s imagination as never […]

Endeavour Room

On Saturday March 25th we ran tours of the Altazimuth Pavilion (‘Altaz’) and Endeavour Room at the ROG so Flamsteed members could see these interesting spaces which are not open to the public. The tours were a try-out both to see if members were interested in this type of weekend event, and to see if […]

For the third time in a row, our Flamsteed observation sessions on the Great Equatorial Telescope were blessed with clear skies and, once again, one of our ROG Astronomers maximised the opportunity to making it a night to remember for our Flamsteed members. This time around, it was ROG’s own ‘rock star’ astronomer, Tom Kerss whom […]

A Flamsteed Astronomy Society workshop on Solar Imaging at Mycenae House, Blackheath. Presented by Rupert Smith. Booking is required. The Solar Imaging Workshop is a presentation of how to start Solar Imaging. It includes an overview of the different types of equipment needed for capturing the Sun in different wavelengths. Image capture techniques are covered […]

The power in the gravitational waves detected on earth on 14 September 2015 was 50 times greater than that pumped out by all the stars in the universe combined. some have said their detection was the most important development in astronomy since Galileo invented the astronomical telescope in 1608. Marcus Chown explains… Marcus Chown is […]

We have arranged a group visit to the National Space Centre in Leicester on Saturday 17 June, starting at 10am. The usual entry price is £14, but we have arranged a group discount so that the price becomes £10 per person. Payment will be due in advance, and we will send details on how to […]

June 19th, Monday 8.00pm Flamsteed Pub Evening at the British Oak, 109 Old Dover Road, Blackheath SE3 8SU.  All are welcome.

July 17th, Monday 8.00pm Flamsteed Pub Evening at the British Oak, 109 Old Dover Road, Blackheath SE3 8SU.  All are welcome.

NASA will make an announcement about the agency’s first mission to fly directly into our sun’s atmosphere during an event at 11 a.m. EDT Wednesday, May 31, from the University of Chicago’s William Eckhardt Research Center Auditorium. The event will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website. from NASA

NASA commercial cargo provider SpaceX is targeting its eleventh commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station for 5:55 p.m. EDT Thursday, June 1. Launch coverage will begin on NASA Television and the agency’s website at 5:15 p.m., followed by the post-launch news conference at 7:30 p.m. from NASA

Early science results from NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter portray the largest planet in our solar system as a complex, gigantic, turbulent world, with Earth-sized polar cyclones, plunging storm systems that travel deep into the heart of the gas giant. from NASA

Media are invited to NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston to view the James Webb Space Telescope and talk to experts about upcoming cryogenic vacuum tests at 10:15 a.m. CDT Wednesday, May 31. from NASA

The following is a statement from NASA acting Administrator Robert Lightfoot on the Fiscal Year 2018 budget proposal released Tuesday. from NASA

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Flamsteed Astronomy Society
May 17, 2017 at 10:03 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared Thomas Pesquet's video.

Gorgeous!

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Thomas Pesquet

A timelapse of aurora into a sunrise. Wait for it, the first bright rise... is not the Sun! https://flic.kr/p/Uj97BT

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
Facebook IconMay 15, 2017 at 5:37 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared a link.

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The first true-color images of Saturn taken during Cassini’s close en

astronomy.com

Astronomy.com is for anyone who wants to learn more about astronomy events, cosmology, planets, galaxies, asteroids, astrophotography, the Big Bang, black holes, comets, constellations, eclipses, exoplanets, nebulae, meteors, quasars, observing, telescopes, NASA, Hubble, space missions, stargazing,…

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
Facebook IconMay 13, 2017 at 4:04 pm

Blackheath observing is CONFIRMED ON for this evening (Saturday 13 May).

Meet from 9.30pm at our usual location, north of Talbot Place, on Blackheath.

See http://flamsteed.info/event/blackheath-observing-saturday-13-may/ for location details.

All are welcome to attend, members and non-members.

flamsteed.info

flamsteed.info

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
Facebook IconMay 11, 2017 at 5:59 pm

We will be running a Blackheath Observing session on Saturday 13 May from 9.30pm until around 11.30pm.

The Moon will be absent during our session and the main event of the evening will surely be Jupiter. At around 9.30, Io will transit, casting its shadow across Jupiter’s clouds. So come along and enjoy this and other objects before the bright summer skies intrude.

We will have at least three scopes available at the session, but please feel free to come along with your own. The more the merrier!

A go / no-go announcement will be made by 4pm on Saturday.

Blackheath is quite exposed, so please wrap up warm.

We will meet at our usual spot just north of Talbot Place at 9.30pm. Talbot Place is the first left off Goffers Road after the Tea Hut. Parking is free after 6.30pm.

See http://flamsteed.info/event/blackheath-observing-saturday-13-may/ for location details.

flamsteed.info

flamsteed.info

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
May 10, 2017 at 10:59 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared NASA's Cassini Mission to Saturn's photo.

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NASA's Cassini Mission to Saturn

The Cassini spacecraft has captured the closest-ever image of the “propeller” feature in Saturn’s rings known informally as Bleriot. The propeller is named after Louis Bleriot, the French aviator who in 1909 was the first person to fly across the English Channel. It’s the largest of the propellers in Saturn's rings. As in Cassini's other propeller close-up images, the central moonlet itself seems to be obscured by the stirred-up ring material around it, so that it cannot be directly seen. It would be about three pixels across, and lies at the center of the propeller structure. Many small, bright specks and linear, scratch-like artifacts are visible in the image. These artifacts are due to cosmic rays and particles of radiation near the planet striking the camera detector during the exposure. Get details at: https://go.nasa.gov/2pApupp

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
May 9, 2017 at 11:02 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared NASA's Cassini Mission to Saturn's photo.

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NASA's Cassini Mission to Saturn

The Cassini spacecraft captured this view of bands of bright, feathery methane clouds drifting across Saturn's moon Titan on May 7, 2017. The dark regions at the top are Titan's hydrocarbon lakes and seas. Although Cassini will have no further close, targeted flybys of Titan, the spacecraft continues to observe the giant moon and its atmosphere from a distance. See more details: go.nasa.gov/2q4drSk

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
May 9, 2017 at 4:29 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared NASA's Cassini Mission to Saturn's photo.

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NASA's Cassini Mission to Saturn

The Cassini spacecraft is nominal after our third #GrandFinale dive through the gap between Saturn and its rings. https://go.nasa.gov/2qcf2Vx

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
May 8, 2017 at 10:36 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared Astronomy Magazine's post.

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Astronomy Magazine

A preview of Cassini's final chapter. http://trib.al/9eQTZh2

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
May 8, 2017 at 4:27 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared NASA's Cassini Mission to Saturn's photo.

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NASA's Cassini Mission to Saturn

Image of the week: Saturn's hexagonal polar jet stream. Details: go.nasa.gov/2pYpjF8

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
May 3, 2017 at 8:19 am

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared Space.com's video.

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Space.com

The space between Saturn and its rings is eerily silent: Researchers monitoring the Cassini spacecraft were surprised to encounter almost no dust and debris during the spacecraft's first dramatic dive through the gap, and you can hear the strange lack of impacts in a new NASA video. https://goo.gl/4gXqaw

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
Facebook IconMay 1, 2017 at 9:44 am

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared a link.

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'Giant Hurricane' on Saturn: 1st Images Back from Cassini's Epic Ring Dive

space.com

New raw images from Cassini's first plunge between Saturn and its rings reveal a "giant hurricane" and other intricate features.

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
Facebook IconApril 27, 2017 at 6:41 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared a link.

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Google Doodle Celebrates Cassini Probe's 'Grand Finale' Saturn Dive

space.com

Today Google is honoring NASA's Cassini mission to Saturn with an adorable Google Doodle featuring the spacecraft swooping between the planet and its rings.

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
April 27, 2017 at 9:06 am

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared NASA's Cassini Mission to Saturn's video.

Facebook Picture
NASA's Cassini Mission to Saturn

We did it! Cassini is in contact with Earth and sending back data after a successful dive through the gap between #Saturn and its rings. Our data are flowing back to Earth, over a billion miles, a trip that takes 78 minutes.

The gap between Saturn and its rings is no longer unexplored space – and we're going back 21 times. #GrandFinale! Saturn.jpl.nasa.gov

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
April 26, 2017 at 12:58 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared NASA's Cassini Mission to Saturn's post.

<3 Google's doodle!! :)

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NASA's Cassini Mission to Saturn

We've been doodled! Get ready for your closeup, Saturn: https://go.nasa.gov/1Up1oba

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
April 26, 2017 at 12:58 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared NASA's Cassini Mission to Saturn's video.

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NASA's Cassini Mission to Saturn

Shields Up! As we pass over Saturn, we're turning our high-gain antenna into a shield RIGHT NOW to deflect oncoming ring particles as we head into the gap between Saturn and its rings. Instruments will be on, but we'll be out of contact with Earth until early Thursday morning. More: https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/grand-finale/milestones/

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
April 25, 2017 at 12:44 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared Astronomy Magazine's post.

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Astronomy Magazine

The mystery of our galaxy's bulge is slowly unravelling.
http://trib.al/hClIC5s

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
April 20, 2017 at 5:55 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared Hubble Space Telescope's post.

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Hubble Space Telescope

Today we celebrate 27 years of Hubble! Check out with whom Hubble is celebrating its anniversary! #Hubble27
https://www.spacetelescope.org/news/heic1709/

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
April 19, 2017 at 6:03 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared Phil Plait's post.

Not one, not two, but three! GAH!

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Phil Plait

Whoa. Alpha Centauri really *is* a triple star! Proxima Centauri is gravitationally bound to it, taking a staggering 600,000 years to make a complete orbit!

http://www.blastr.com/2017-4-19/and-proxima-makes-three-alpha-centauri-really-triple-star

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
Facebook IconApril 17, 2017 at 8:12 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared a link.

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Watch Milky Way’s Stars Move 5 Million Years into the Future

skyandtelescope.com

Astronomers have transformed star data from the Gaia and Hipparcos missions into a video that predicts stellar motions millions of years from now.

Nottingham Astronomical Society
Facebook IconApril 16, 2017 at 12:57 pm

There are still some places left on the One Day Spring Meeting in Eastbourne on Saturday 29th April.

An impressive line-up of topics and speakers talking about "Planets in our solar system and beyond":

Dr John Rogers - "Jupiter”
Mr Michael Foulkes – "Amateur observations of Saturn"
Prof David Rothery – "Mercury: new insights into the Sun's closest planet"
Dr Guillem Anglada Escude - "Proxima b, planets around red dwarfs and the search for life beyond the Solar System"
Dr Eamonn Kerins - "Exoplanet science in the era of many worlds"

Booking information available on the website:

https://britastro.org/node/7996

One Day Spring Meeting - "Planets in our solar system and beyond" | British Astronomical Association

britastro.org

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
April 15, 2017 at 11:55 pm

Thanks to all who came to our Blackheath observing session this evening. We were treated to some fabulous views of Jupiter and the 4 Galilean moons, as well as some lovely views of double stars like Algieba, Cor Caroli and Castor.

We had a good 2-3 hours of clear skies, despite what the forecast said! It was a bit cold with the wind, but everyone enjoyed it.

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
Facebook IconApril 15, 2017 at 4:04 pm

Our Blackheath observing session is CONFIRMED ON for tonight (Saturday 15 April) from 8.30pm.

See http://flamsteed.info/event/blackheath-observing-friday-14-april-or-saturday-15-april/ for location details.

We are taking a bit of a risk in going ahead, as there is likely to be some cloud overhead. However, we hope that there will be enough clear spells to get good views of some of our target objects.

We should be able to spot Mars in the twilight, low in the west, once it gets dark enough. Mars isn't in a favourable position for observation at the moment, as it heads towards superior conjunction, but we will give it a go in any case!

The (wandering) "star" of the show will be Jupiter. Rising in the east just after 7pm, we should be able to get some decent views from 9pm onwards. Jupiter reached opposition last week, so this is a particularly good time for us to view the largest planet in the solar system. All of the Galilean moons should be visible on both nights, with the Great Red Spot coming into view later on Saturday evening.

There will be plenty of other objects to view. Orion is past its best, though is still visible low in the west. Gemini and Leo are well placed, giving us the opportunity to view the double stars Castor and Algieba, as well as the open cluster M44 (Beehive / Praesepe) in Cancer. Later on, we will try to view the globular cluster M13 in Hercules.

Though the nights are getting warmer, Blackheath is quite exposed, so please wrap up warm!

We will meet at our usual spot just north of Talbot Place at 8.30pm. Talbot Place is the first left off Goffers Road after the Tea Hut. Parking is free after 6.30pm.

All are welcome to attend, and please feel free to bring observing equipment if you have it. Otherwise, there should be plenty of telescopes available for you to use.

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Blackheath Observing – Saturday 15 April

flamsteed.info

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS EVENT HAS BEEN MOVED TO SATURDAY EVENING! We will be running a Blackheath Observing session on Saturday 15 April, from 8.30pm until around 11pm. We look forward to seeing you there. Please bring a telescope if you can, the more the merrier! If not there should be at least three...

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
Facebook IconApril 14, 2017 at 11:52 am

Weather prospects do not look positive for this evening, so we will move our Blackheath observing session to tomorrow evening (Saturday) from 8.30pm.

http://flamsteed.info/event/blackheath-observing-friday-14-april-or-saturday-15-april/

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Blackheath Observing – Saturday 15 April

flamsteed.info

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
Facebook IconFebruary 24, 2017 at 1:32 pm

Blackheath observing has been CANCELLED for this evening, due to poor weather. Our next scheduled Blackheath event will be 17 or 18 March. http://flamsteed.info/event/blackheath-observing-friday-17-march-or-saturday-18-march/

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Blackheath Observing – Friday 17 March or Saturday 18 March

flamsteed.info

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
February 22, 2017 at 10:42 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared The Royal Society's post.

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The Royal Society

Well, this is pretty exciting.

Seven newly identified planets orbiting a nearby star offer a realistic chance to seek signs of life beyond the solar system.