Upcoming Events

Thu 18

Introduction to Radio Astronomy

May 18 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

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To join the Flamsteed Astronomy Society, click on this link.

The Flamsteed is an amateur astronomy society at the Royal Observatory and National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, London SE10. It has around 350 members who represent the full range of interests and experience in astronomy. Many are beginners. It is named after the first Astronomer Royal, John Flamsteed.

The Society was founded in 1999, and is part of the membership organisation of Royal Museums Greenwich.

Our lecture meetings are held once a month between September/October and May/June, usually on a Monday evening, in the lecture theatre of the National Maritime Museum, or in the Peter Harrison Planetarium at the Royal Observatory Greenwich (ROG). The Society regularly holds observing evenings using members’ own telescopes.  In addition the Society stages viewing sessions with the ROG’s Great Equatorial Telescope, the largest of its kind in the UK, and seventh largest in the world.

We are an affiliated society of the British Astronomical Association and members of The Federation of Astronomical Societies.The Federation of Astronomical SocietiesBritish Astronomical Association

On Monday April 10, 2017 we had the pleasure of a visit to the NMM Caird Library to look at some of the terrific books, maps, and charts related (vaguely!) to astronomy.   Our visit was hosted by Louise Devoy (Curator of the ROG), Megan Barford (Curator of Cartography), and Gareth Bellis (Manager of the Library). […]

Dr Edward Yeadon

The talk to the History of Astronomy Group was a bit off-piste this time. As Eddie said in his introduction, it could be argued that the subject was neither history nor astronomy. But for a subject so central to modern astronomy any exception was well worthwhile. As well as capturing the public’s imagination as never […]

Endeavour Room

On Saturday March 25th we ran tours of the Altazimuth Pavilion (‘Altaz’) and Endeavour Room at the ROG so Flamsteed members could see these interesting spaces which are not open to the public. The tours were a try-out both to see if members were interested in this type of weekend event, and to see if […]

For the third time in a row, our Flamsteed observation sessions on the Great Equatorial Telescope were blessed with clear skies and, once again, one of our ROG Astronomers maximised the opportunity to making it a night to remember for our Flamsteed members. This time around, it was ROG’s own ‘rock star’ astronomer, Tom Kerss whom […]

A workshop meeting of the Radio Astronomy special interest group took place at Mycenae House on the 7th December 2016. Owing to the usual pre-Christmas commitments, a number of the regular attendees were absent, but this didn’t prevent some useful discussions taking place. The workshop started with a discussion on the data collected by the […]

The spacecraft was launched in 1997 and reached the planet Saturn in 2004. The Cassini part of the spacecraft has been in orbit for almost 13 years, returning invaluable information about the planet, its rings and moons. In particular Cassini’s cameras have returned more than 300,000 images of the Saturn system. In November 2016 the […]

We will be running a Blackheath Observing session on Friday 12 May (or Saturday 13 May, if the weather is poor on Friday evening) from 9.30pm until around 11.30pm. We look forward to seeing you there. Please bring a telescope if you can, the more the merrier! If not there should be at least three […]

In this workshop, we will explain how to set up simple radio systems for meteor detection and solar flare monitoring. These systems use relatively small radio aerials and cheap equipment, and do not require much technical expertise to set up. This workshop will be held at Mycenae House, Blackheath from 7pm on Thursday 18th May. […]

May 22nd, Monday 8.00pm Flamsteed Pub Evening at the British Oak, 109 Old Dover Road, Blackheath SE3 8SU.  All are welcome.

Flamsteed History of Astronomy Group Meeting. In 2015 Bobby Manoo spent two weeks in Egypt and, like many before, found himself in awe of the majestic ancient monuments, cultural strength, remarkable knowledge of the ancient Egyptians and their in-depth knowledge in maths, science and engineering but, particularly, in their astronomy and their knowledge of our […]

NASA’s digital communications team will be honored at the 21st Annual Webby Awards on May 16 in New York. For the first time, NASA’s social media presence has been recognized by the Webby Awards, winning in corporate communications and being honored with the People’s Voice Award. from NASA

NASA has awarded the Goddard Logistics and Technical Information II (GLTI II) Services Contract to TRAX International Corporation of Las Vegas. from NASA

NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson, currently living and working aboard the International Space Station, broke the record Monday for cumulative time spent in space by a U.S. astronaut – an occasion that was celebrated with a phone call from President Donald Trump, First Daughter Ivanka Trump, and fellow astronaut Kate Rubins. from NASA

President Donald Trump, First Daughter Ivanka Trump, and NASA astronaut Kate Rubins will make a special 20-minute, Earth-to-space call at 10 a.m. EDT Monday, April 24, to personally congratulate NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson for her record-breaking stay aboard the International Space Station. from NASA

After a six-hour flight, NASA astronaut Jack Fischer and cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin of the Russian space agency Roscosmos arrived at the International Space Station at 9:23 a.m. EDT Thursday where they will continue important scientific research. from NASA

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Flamsteed Astronomy Society
Facebook IconApril 27, 2017 at 6:41 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared a link.

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Google Doodle Celebrates Cassini Probe's 'Grand Finale' Saturn Dive

space.com

Today Google is honoring NASA's Cassini mission to Saturn with an adorable Google Doodle featuring the spacecraft swooping between the planet and its rings.

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
April 27, 2017 at 9:06 am

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared NASA's Cassini Mission to Saturn's video.

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NASA's Cassini Mission to Saturn

We did it! Cassini is in contact with Earth and sending back data after a successful dive through the gap between #Saturn and its rings. Our data are flowing back to Earth, over a billion miles, a trip that takes 78 minutes.

The gap between Saturn and its rings is no longer unexplored space – and we're going back 21 times. #GrandFinale! Saturn.jpl.nasa.gov

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
April 26, 2017 at 12:58 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared NASA's Cassini Mission to Saturn's post.

<3 Google's doodle!! :)

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NASA's Cassini Mission to Saturn

We've been doodled! Get ready for your closeup, Saturn: https://go.nasa.gov/1Up1oba

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
April 26, 2017 at 12:58 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared NASA's Cassini Mission to Saturn's video.

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NASA's Cassini Mission to Saturn

Shields Up! As we pass over Saturn, we're turning our high-gain antenna into a shield RIGHT NOW to deflect oncoming ring particles as we head into the gap between Saturn and its rings. Instruments will be on, but we'll be out of contact with Earth until early Thursday morning. More: https://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/grand-finale/milestones/

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
April 25, 2017 at 12:44 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared Astronomy Magazine's post.

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Astronomy Magazine

The mystery of our galaxy's bulge is slowly unravelling.
http://trib.al/hClIC5s

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
April 20, 2017 at 5:55 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared Hubble Space Telescope's post.

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Hubble Space Telescope

Today we celebrate 27 years of Hubble! Check out with whom Hubble is celebrating its anniversary! #Hubble27
https://www.spacetelescope.org/news/heic1709/

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
April 19, 2017 at 6:03 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared Phil Plait's post.

Not one, not two, but three! GAH!

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Phil Plait

Whoa. Alpha Centauri really *is* a triple star! Proxima Centauri is gravitationally bound to it, taking a staggering 600,000 years to make a complete orbit!

http://www.blastr.com/2017-4-19/and-proxima-makes-three-alpha-centauri-really-triple-star

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
Facebook IconApril 17, 2017 at 8:12 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared a link.

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Watch Milky Way’s Stars Move 5 Million Years into the Future

skyandtelescope.com

Astronomers have transformed star data from the Gaia and Hipparcos missions into a video that predicts stellar motions millions of years from now.

Nottingham Astronomical Society
Facebook IconApril 16, 2017 at 12:57 pm

There are still some places left on the One Day Spring Meeting in Eastbourne on Saturday 29th April.

An impressive line-up of topics and speakers talking about "Planets in our solar system and beyond":

Dr John Rogers - "Jupiter”
Mr Michael Foulkes – "Amateur observations of Saturn"
Prof David Rothery – "Mercury: new insights into the Sun's closest planet"
Dr Guillem Anglada Escude - "Proxima b, planets around red dwarfs and the search for life beyond the Solar System"
Dr Eamonn Kerins - "Exoplanet science in the era of many worlds"

Booking information available on the website:

https://britastro.org/node/7996

One Day Spring Meeting - "Planets in our solar system and beyond" | British Astronomical Association

britastro.org

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
April 15, 2017 at 11:55 pm

Thanks to all who came to our Blackheath observing session this evening. We were treated to some fabulous views of Jupiter and the 4 Galilean moons, as well as some lovely views of double stars like Algieba, Cor Caroli and Castor.

We had a good 2-3 hours of clear skies, despite what the forecast said! It was a bit cold with the wind, but everyone enjoyed it.

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
Facebook IconApril 15, 2017 at 4:04 pm

Our Blackheath observing session is CONFIRMED ON for tonight (Saturday 15 April) from 8.30pm.

See http://flamsteed.info/event/blackheath-observing-friday-14-april-or-saturday-15-april/ for location details.

We are taking a bit of a risk in going ahead, as there is likely to be some cloud overhead. However, we hope that there will be enough clear spells to get good views of some of our target objects.

We should be able to spot Mars in the twilight, low in the west, once it gets dark enough. Mars isn't in a favourable position for observation at the moment, as it heads towards superior conjunction, but we will give it a go in any case!

The (wandering) "star" of the show will be Jupiter. Rising in the east just after 7pm, we should be able to get some decent views from 9pm onwards. Jupiter reached opposition last week, so this is a particularly good time for us to view the largest planet in the solar system. All of the Galilean moons should be visible on both nights, with the Great Red Spot coming into view later on Saturday evening.

There will be plenty of other objects to view. Orion is past its best, though is still visible low in the west. Gemini and Leo are well placed, giving us the opportunity to view the double stars Castor and Algieba, as well as the open cluster M44 (Beehive / Praesepe) in Cancer. Later on, we will try to view the globular cluster M13 in Hercules.

Though the nights are getting warmer, Blackheath is quite exposed, so please wrap up warm!

We will meet at our usual spot just north of Talbot Place at 8.30pm. Talbot Place is the first left off Goffers Road after the Tea Hut. Parking is free after 6.30pm.

All are welcome to attend, and please feel free to bring observing equipment if you have it. Otherwise, there should be plenty of telescopes available for you to use.

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Blackheath Observing – Saturday 15 April

flamsteed.info

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS EVENT HAS BEEN MOVED TO SATURDAY EVENING! We will be running a Blackheath Observing session on Saturday 15 April, from 8.30pm until around 11pm. We look forward to seeing you there. Please bring a telescope if you can, the more the merrier! If not there should be at least three...

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
Facebook IconApril 14, 2017 at 11:52 am

Weather prospects do not look positive for this evening, so we will move our Blackheath observing session to tomorrow evening (Saturday) from 8.30pm.

http://flamsteed.info/event/blackheath-observing-friday-14-april-or-saturday-15-april/

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Blackheath Observing – Saturday 15 April

flamsteed.info

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
Facebook IconFebruary 24, 2017 at 1:32 pm

Blackheath observing has been CANCELLED for this evening, due to poor weather. Our next scheduled Blackheath event will be 17 or 18 March. http://flamsteed.info/event/blackheath-observing-friday-17-march-or-saturday-18-march/

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Blackheath Observing – Friday 17 March or Saturday 18 March

flamsteed.info

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
February 22, 2017 at 10:42 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared The Royal Society's post.

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The Royal Society

Well, this is pretty exciting.

Seven newly identified planets orbiting a nearby star offer a realistic chance to seek signs of life beyond the solar system.

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
February 22, 2017 at 7:39 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared ESO Astronomy's photo.

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ESO Astronomy

Comparison of the sizes of the #TRAPPIST1 planets with Solar System bodies. View larger image: http://socsi.in/7g9Ap Image credit: ESO Astronomy /O. Furtak Read more about the 7 Earth-sized planets recently discovered around #TRAPPIST1 star, using the TRAPPIST–South telescope at our La Silla Observatory and the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at Paranal, among other telescopes. http://socsi.in/qiObm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
Facebook IconFebruary 22, 2017 at 7:39 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared a link.

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This discovery is a lottery win for astronomers looking for life beyond Earth

theguardian.com

The seven planets discovered around the dwarf star Trappist-1 confirm that the coming decade will belong to the study of exoplanets

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
February 22, 2017 at 7:38 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared ESO Astronomy's post.

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ESO Astronomy

Grab your #VirtualReality hardware and check out the view from the surface of TRAPPIST-1b, the closest planet in the system to the central ultra cool dwarf star, #TRAPPIST1. The video material can be explored also directly from our website in 2D. Video credit: ESO Astronomy /L. Calçada/spaceengine.org

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
February 22, 2017 at 7:38 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared Space.com's video.

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Space.com

NASA just made its big announcement and this is the crux of it: The dwarf star TRAPPIST-1, which is located about 39 light-years from Earth, is orbited by 7 (yes SEVEN!) Earth-sized planets, three of which could harbor oceans of water, making them possible homes for life. Exciting news, right? Read our full report: https://goo.gl/5BiRCM

Annabel Burn
February 21, 2017 at 11:00 pm

Fantastic evening at the Great Equatorial Telescope. A 40 minute illustrates lecture in the planetarium on the current night sky followed by another lecture with the telescope about the potential for future observing at Greenwich with an opportunity to review the astrophotography winners in between. Fabulous thank you. Hardly noticed that it was a cloudy night!

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
Facebook IconFebruary 17, 2017 at 5:05 pm

Blackheath Observing session is CONFIRMED ON for tonight (Friday 17 February). Meet from 7.30pm. See http://flamsteed.info/event/blackheath-observing-friday-17-february-or-saturday-18-february/ for a map.

At the start of our session Uranus, Mars and Venus should still be visible in the SSW portion of the Sky (note, we will be running an extra even next weekend with an early start to allow us to view these planets as they will be very close in the sky). By 8.00pm, the Constellation of Orion will be at its highest offering views of M42 and and the jewel like double of Sigma Orionis that is placed between the Orion and Horsehead Nebula. As we move on through the night the easy sight for us on Blackheath is the pretty Beehive Cluster, M44 an open cluster containing a mixture of gold and blue stars which will be in the SE and climbing. A similar sight in the SW is the Hyades, Caldwell 41, a distinctive V shape mix of colourful stars dominated by Aldebaran which marks the eye of the Bull in the Constellation Taurus. These are just a few of the sights available to us from Blackheath and well worth viewing.

Blackheath is quite exposed so please wrap up warm.

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Blackheath Observing – Friday 17 February – CONFIRMED ON

flamsteed.info

THIS EVENT IS CONFIRMED ON We will be running a Blackheath Observing session on Friday 17 February from 7.30pm until around 11pm. At the start of our session Uranus, Mars and Venus should still be visible in the SSW portion of the Sky (note, we will be running an extra even next weekend with an earl...

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
February 14, 2017 at 9:26 am

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared Spaceweather.com's post.

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Spaceweather.com

ROUND OBJECT CROSSES THE MOON: As observers around the planet were capturing images of Friday's penumbral eclipse, one photographer saw something unusual: a round object crossing in front of the Moon. "I was using a 125mm telescope to capture the eclipse when the small black disk appeared," says Luis G. Verdiales from Loiza, Puerto Rico. "It was moving too slow to be a satellite, so slow that I was able to capture it with my camera four times. It got my attention because it was round!"

Verdiales contacted the Caribbean Island's largest astronomy organization to find out what it was.

Eddie Irizarry of the Sociedad de Astronomía del Caribe explains what happened next: "After analysing magnified images, we suspected it might be a stratosphere balloon from Google Loon, a project that is testing internet coverage from the stratosphere," says Irizarry. "We checked FlightRadar24.com and indeed found a balloon at 64,400 ft identified as HBAL176. Further analysis showed the balloon was right between the observer and the Moon."

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
January 31, 2017 at 10:14 pm

Flamsteed Astronomy Society shared ESO Astronomy's photo.

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ESO Astronomy

Discover the immersive #Paranal world in this Facebook 360 photo. Paranal is home of the world's most advanced visible-light astronomical observatory, ESO's Very Large Telescope.
Credit: Yuri Beletsky Nightscapes / ESO Astronomy

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
January 27, 2017 at 2:22 pm

Blackheath observing has been CANCELLED this month due to poor weather conditions. Our next event is scheduled for 17/18 February.

http://flamsteed.info/event/blackheath-observing-friday-17-february-or-saturday-18-february/

Sarah Weinstein
Facebook IconJanuary 21, 2017 at 7:27 pm

Hi all, I am part of a team of computer scientists working on a weather app for aspiring or amateur astronomers. If you have a few minutes to help us out by filling out a survey we would really appreciate it! There are 10 questions, no contact details are collected, and responses will be used only for research purposes. Thank you so much!

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Stargazer Survey

docs.google.com

We are a team of computer scientists working on a weather app for aspiring or amateur astronomers! There are 10 questions, no contact details are collected and responses will be used only for research purposes.

Flamsteed Astronomy Society
December 17, 2016 at 2:57 pm

Please note that our Blackheath Observing session, scheduled for this evening (Saturday 17 December 2016) has been CANCELLED due to poor weather.