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Home Forums General Discussion Pluto- New Horizon

This topic contains 20 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Brian Blake 3 years, 4 months ago.

Viewing 6 posts - 16 through 21 (of 21 total)
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  • #11712

    Mike Meynell
    Moderator
    Topics: 119
    Replies: 756

    Some are blank so, I assume something was corrupted in the transmission.

    They might look blank, but in fact there is data in the image.

    The additional information on the apparent “blank” images states the following:

    Sometimes the images appear to be blank. This is usually caused by: (a) there are only a small number of objects in the picture that are visible at the selected exposure time (e.g., only Pluto, Charon, and a couple of fairly bright stars are visible in 1×1 mode LORRI images when the exposure time is less than 150 ms), and/or (b) the intensity stretch is not optimized for the limited dynamic range of the signal in the image. In either case, you might want to download the JPEG yourself (the full version, not the thumbnail) and play with the intensity stretch using image processing software on your computer (on an Apple computer, you can use either the Preview or iPhoto applications; there are similar options on other computers). For example, you might start seeing objects if you move the white level of the stretch to smaller values. And you may need to magnify particular regions to see the object(s) better. See what you can find by digging a bit deeper!

    I’ve just downloaded a couple and manipulated in Photoshop, and it’s certainly possible to pick up detail that you can’t see on the unprocessed image in a few cases.

    #11714

    Tej
    Participant
    Topics: 39
    Replies: 597

    I have been looking at the images downloaded so far. Some are blank so, I assume something was corrupted in the transmission. I hope they will retry.
    As a boy, I remember scientists describing Pluto as a billiard ball with craters.
    Their best guesses usually are not the best.

    http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/soc/Pluto-Encounter/index.php?page=1

    Ah those pics that appear to be blank are not actually blank, they are of the moon Nix, which is so far away but you can spot it amongst the blackness of space if you click the thumbnail and then again to zoom further and search around. In the description they invite us to download the Jpeg and process it ourselves, stretch it to eek out more of Nix. I actually see two distant objects in some “blank” pics so not sure which is which. Each of them has a nice crescent to it too. So this gallery is clearly a dump of all the hi res being gathered s far without any processing or descriptions. SO maybe we can discover things for ourselves!

    Hydra looks to be not so spherical. It has a lumpiness to it for instance. And Charon, wow the details are fantastic on that. Hey, there is an interesting dark ridge on its cap…in fact it literally looks like a cap which you can unscrew and have a look inside!

    Looking at these hi res stunning captures really marks what an awesomely engineered flyby that was. And these are just a small fraction of pictures to come over the next year.

    GO New Horizons, go bag a kuiper belt asteroid!

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 6 months ago by  Tej.
    #11757

    Mike Meynell
    Moderator
    Topics: 119
    Replies: 756

    Wow… what an image… you’ve got to be kidding me:

    http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/Multimedia/Science-Photos/pics/Pluto-Wide-FINAL-9-17-15.jpg

    From the New Horizons website:

    Just 15 minutes after its closest approach to Pluto on July 14, 2015, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft looked back toward the sun and captured this near-sunset view of the rugged, icy mountains and flat ice plains extending to Pluto’s horizon. The smooth expanse of the informally named icy plain Sputnik Planum (right) is flanked to the west (left) by rugged mountains up to 11,000 feet (3,500 meters) high, including the informally named Norgay Montes in the foreground and Hillary Montes on the skyline. To the right, east of Sputnik, rougher terrain is cut by apparent glaciers. The backlighting highlights more than a dozen layers of haze in Pluto’s tenuous but distended atmosphere. The image was taken from a distance of 11,000 miles (18,000 kilometers) to Pluto; the scene is 780 miles (1,250 kilometers) wide.

    #11759

    Tej
    Participant
    Topics: 39
    Replies: 597

    Man, they’re not kidding, alright…jaw dropping! I am now officially worshiping New Horizons.

    What a spectacular image, especially when zooming in on segments to see those distant mountains across the plain. The perspective of this shot is just stunning and the sunlit atmosphere…wow. I cropped my favourite segment and making this my desktop wallpaper!

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 6 months ago by  Tej.
    • This reply was modified 3 years, 6 months ago by  Tej.
    • This reply was modified 3 years, 6 months ago by  Tej.
    #11764

    Mike Meynell
    Moderator
    Topics: 119
    Replies: 756

    I cropped my favourite segment and making this my desktop wallpaper!

    Careful… you won’t get any work done if you’re staring at that all day πŸ˜‰

    #12288

    Brian Blake
    Participant
    Topics: 188
    Replies: 409
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