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Home Forums General Discussion Rosetta – Philae landing on Comet 67P

This topic contains 146 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Christina Chester 1 year ago.

Viewing 12 posts - 136 through 147 (of 147 total)
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  • #9641

    Andy Sawers
    Moderator
    Topics: 113
    Replies: 588

    Amazingly lucky that its bounce didn’t ping it away from the comet into the nothingness of space.

    #9646

    Brian Blake
    Participant
    Topics: 187
    Replies: 409

    http://t.co/7wg1xi0V6F interesting article.

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 9 months ago by  Brian Blake.
    • This reply was modified 2 years, 9 months ago by  Andy Sawers. Reason: trying to fix link
    #9649

    Tej
    Participant
    Topics: 36
    Replies: 582

    Your link was broken again, Brian

    Here it is:
    http://goo.gl/FGlNBz

    #9721

    Brian Blake
    Participant
    Topics: 187
    Replies: 409
    #9875

    Brian Blake
    Participant
    Topics: 187
    Replies: 409
    #10870

    Brian Blake
    Participant
    Topics: 187
    Replies: 409
    #11274

    Mike Meynell
    Moderator
    Topics: 119
    Replies: 746

    Philae is alive!!!!

    Really wasn’t expecting this – 40 more seconds of data so far, apparently. Amazing stuff.

    http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2015/06/14/rosettas-lander-philae-wakes-up-from-hibernation/

    #11276

    Tej
    Participant
    Topics: 36
    Replies: 582

    So exciting, were posting on two different threads, lol.

     

    You know regardless of whatever data has been gained from Philae, the whole mission is a glorious testament to the engineering brilliance and cleverness of incorporating fallback machanisms and resistance to harsh conditions and the unpredictable.

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 2 months ago by  Tej.
    #12797

    Andy Sawers
    Moderator
    Topics: 113
    Replies: 588

    Sadly, Philae’s contribution has now come to an end. It is “probably now covered in dust and too cold to function” says the German space agency DLR, which will no longer send commands to the lander. (No, I wasn’t wiping away a tear, I just had an anthropomorphism in my eye.)

    Rosetta continues, of course – at least until it is deliberately crashed into 67P next September.

    One funny remark from Astrofest by ESA’s Mark McCaughran (approximate paraphrase): “While we applaud Nasa’s New Horizon’s mission to a Kuiper Belt object, we in ESA were cleverer than that: we waited for a Kuiper Belt object to come to us.”

    #12806

    Tej
    Participant
    Topics: 36
    Replies: 582

    Quite sad about Philae but it at least it did return useful data in that 60 hour rollercoaster ride window.

     

    I remember Mark’s comment and actually, with the keiper belt object close to the sun, they are able to get much more information out of it as the sun “cooks” it, whereas Horizons will meet an expectedly dormant object but it will still make for useful data comparisons of different states and not to mention a huge technical achievement in precision navigation of phenomenal distances.

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 6 months ago by  Tej.
    #13862

    Andy Sawers
    Moderator
    Topics: 113
    Replies: 588

    And so it ends – as we knew it must.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-36903465

    #13864

    Christina Chester
    Participant
    Topics: 16
    Replies: 192

    Sad times. At least we have a couple of months of quality time with Rosetta left.

     

    I feel emotionally attached to the little space probe that took a giant leap onto 67P for all of robot-kind.

     

    RIP Philae ⚰

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