Upcoming Events

Mon 23

Flamsteed Pub Evening

October 23 @ 8:00 pm - 11:00 pm
Thu 26

Telescope Workshop

October 26 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm

Subscribe to Flamsteed via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this website and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,533 other subscribers

Home Forums Useful Stuff The Extrasolar Planets Encyclopaedia, data and graphs

This topic contains 4 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  BillOB 2 years, 5 months ago.

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #11152

    BillOB
    Participant
    Topics: 16
    Replies: 35

    http://exoplanet.eu/

    If you go to diagrams, you can choose the x and y data.
    With over thirty different sets of data, I am sure one or two Flamsteed members could find something informative.

    #11153

    Andy Sawers
    Moderator
    Topics: 115
    Replies: 589

    Bill, that’s hours of fun! Cool! And just a sliver of a prospect of a Nobel Prize as well 😉 !!! Thanks for this!

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 5 months ago by  Andy Sawers. Reason: Can't flippin' spell 'Nobel' properly
    • This reply was modified 2 years, 5 months ago by  Andy Sawers. Reason: Can't flippin' spell 'Bill', either
    #11157

    BillOB
    Participant
    Topics: 16
    Replies: 35

    Hi Andy,
    I tried
    x-axis Age of host star
    y-axis Mass of host star

    Conclusion:
    The older it gets its mass becomes approx. 0.75 solMass!
    I’m calling it Bills’ Law.

    Just stick the medal in the post.

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 5 months ago by  BillOB.
    #11159

    Mike Meynell
    Moderator
    Topics: 119
    Replies: 749

    The older it gets its mass becomes approx. 0.75 solMass!
    I’m calling it Bills’ Law.

    Hmmmm…

    Not wishing to rain on your parade, but…

    The host star mass ranges from around 0.02 to 4.5 solar masses. From the data, it would appear that the distribution peaks at around 1 solar mass. Surely, this is not a coincidence? It looks like a clear selection effect, as we are searching for exoplanets around sunlike stars.

    Sorry, Bill… but the medal may have to wait 😉

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 5 months ago by  Mike Meynell.
    #11163

    BillOB
    Participant
    Topics: 16
    Replies: 35

    ex falso quodlibet

    I was following on from Andys’ getting a Nobel prize.

    But, as the data is selective (they have an upper limit) interpretation needs careful scrutiny.
    It would be easy to extrapolate results to an erroneous conclusion.

    (Sorry Mike, my fault. I should have made that clear. I stand before you, humbled, in sackcloth and ashes!)

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 5 months ago by  BillOB.
Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.