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Home Forums Observing and Imaging Group Blackheath Observing – 14 May 2016

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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  • #13576
    Mike Meynell
    Moderator
    Topics: 119
    Replies: 756

    A really enjoyable session on Blackheath last night… once again, the weather forecasters got it wrong! Well done to Rupert for going ahead despite the forecast of partially cloudy skies. In the end, it was clear as a bell.

    Here are a few of my images from last night, starting with the image of Jupiter, showing the peculiar “bulge” in the northern equatorial belt:

    Jupiter from Blackheath 14 May 2016

    A couple of poor’ish efforts of M13 and M57 next… not great objects to image from the heath… but here they are:

    M13 Globular cluster in Hercules:

    M13 Hercules Cluster from Blackheath 14 May 2016

    M57 Ring Nebula:

    M57 Ring Nebula from Blackheath 14 May 2016

    Any finally, for Tej, I’ve met his challenge of imaging the Apollo 11 landing site on the Moon. OK, I haven’t actually picked up the lunar lander… but I have picked up the 3 craters named after Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins, and have shown on the image where the landing site is:

    Moon from Blackheath 14 May 2016 showing Apollo 11 landing site

    • This topic was modified 3 years, 6 months ago by Mike Meynell.
    #13578
    Mike Meynell
    Moderator
    Topics: 119
    Replies: 756

    As regards the new feature in the North Equatorial Belt, I found this reference in a 1988 BAA journal:

    From 1988 BAA journal, p.234… “The NEBs dark patches are long-lived, lasting for months or years. Although described as ‘projections’ from the NEB, they seem to be separate entities. Their characteristic bluish-grey colour has long been noted by good visual observers, and is striking in photographs, often contrasting with the browner colour in the NEB itself.

    So, quite common features by the sounds of it… and this one will be around for a while yet!

    #13579
    Tej
    Participant
    Topics: 39
    Replies: 597

    I was looking forward to seeing those pics.  It was a brilliant night.  Your “live” imaging on your laptop was drawing great results already in just your quick process form and YES!, you got the Apollo 11 named astronaut craters, awesome.

     

    I aimed for it visually on my telescope but the mirrored view of my CST was confusing my orientation and I took so long, I was neglecting my “guests”!   But I did finally find it after everyone had gone (sometime after midnight!).  I had my 2.5X powermate combined with my Hyperium zoom at highest power making it a rather silly 3.2mm (600X mag) and despite my telescope being out of collimation (why does Rupert keep noticing my scope being out of collimation…grrr…no really, thanks Rupert 🙂 ), the seeing was terrific that night, and the moon landscape was a joy to “fly” over, with the alpine valley looking so distinct, I imagined an X-Wing flying through it with 3 Tie fighters hot on its tail.  And then further up the terminator (crossing the lava seas), there was an enormous “mountain range” which I later found out to be called Montes Apenninus which entails the highest mountain on the moon and at one end of the range, Appollo 15 had landed which was considered the most scientifically successful mission of the Apollo program given the diversity of the area’s material.  Sounds a risky part to land on though!  Wish I knew that information while observing it but next time! Then we the moon tour ends with the always fascinating Clavius crater of nested craters and mountains.

     

    Mike, whats happened to your Ring nebula image…it was far more vivid and colourful on your “quick capture” camera LCD display on the night! There were distinct red and blue colours and looked wonderful….I’m sure you put the wrong up!

     

    I love how we were all staking claim to the new Jupiter feature 🙂 Rupert claiming “first” but then I told him, he thought was the Great Red Spot and I knew it wasnt because I checked what time it will appear as part of my prep before coming, and it was for much later in the night, ha…but then when Mike imaged Jupiter and showing us the fresh out of the oven quick process result…whoaa, my first reaction was what the hell was that!? That “bulge”  looked like a giant leech attaching itself to one of the prominent gas bands.  Amazing capture, Mike.  I have not heard anything about it on any Astronomy news sites, though? Maybe it was a repercussion of that asteroid impact in March and probably was there since that time?

     

    Saturn and Mars, although low was a spectacular climax to end the night with, especially on Mike’s scope, I could clearly see a huge dust storm region as well as the ice caps.  I could also see the Cassini division on Saturn and this was despite both Mars and Saturn still being quite low.   Again, after everyone had gone, I wanted to enjoy looking at these two objects a bit more before packing as I wont get much opportunity like this for the summer and the night was still remarkably clear.  The dust storms and ice caps popped out even more but not as sharp as on Mike’s and Rupert’s APM telescopes.

     

    An enjoyable crowd once again, oh and thank you to the lovely two guests (whom I have disgracefully forgotten their names 🙁 ) for the very tasty home made quiche…that was yummy!

     

    Great call, Rupert to have the session on…I say stick with your own predictions from looking at those current sattellite images!

     

    A memorable night and well, what a week of astronomy this turned out to be for some of us!

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 6 months ago by Tej.
    #13581
    Astrograph
    Participant
    Topics: 27
    Replies: 102

    It was a good night indeed!

    Tej, sorry to mention the collimation!…and Mike’s was the only APM that night, this time round I bought some other Russian inspired glass, a TEC 140.

    Clear skies again tonight. Shame its lecture night!

     

    #13582
    Tej
    Participant
    Topics: 39
    Replies: 597

    Mike:  My bad, I forgot I had my damn monitor in dull Text mode, switched it back to calibrated and now I can see the colours of your ring nebula 🙂

    #13592
    Mike Meynell
    Moderator
    Topics: 119
    Replies: 756

    Mike: My bad, I forgot I had my damn monitor in dull Text mode, switched it back to calibrated and now I can see the colours of your ring nebula 🙂

    No problem, Tej. The image is rubbish… but at least it shows it can be picked up even on the heath. I should have taken several images and stacked… this is just a one shot, one-minute exposure.

    Rupert has written a nice report of the evening’s events, which is now online: http://flamsteed.info/2016/05/blackheath-observing-saturday-14-may-2016/

    #13643
    souls33k3r
    Participant
    Topics: 5
    Replies: 47

    Tej, there were the lovely Julia’s … I’m pretty sure that was their names 🙂

    Sorry for the late response, it was an amazing night full of astronomy, banter and claims being made on the new feature of Jupiter.

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