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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 40 total)
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  • in reply to: I speak Astronomy #17193
    Clive Inglis
    Participant
    Topics: 17
    Replies: 41

    This is more my kinda music!

    in reply to: Photographing an eclipse #16456
    Clive Inglis
    Participant
    Topics: 17
    Replies: 41

    Hi Graham and  Trudy,

    As I replied at the solar viewing session on Tuesday I have no experience in photographing a solar eclipse and suggested you posted on the forum to see if any of our more experienced astrophotographers could offer you some advice. However, I had a quick look on the internet and found this website which might be a good starting point:Photographing an eclipse.

    Hope this helps. Any questions you have hopefully one of our members might be able answer via this forum. Have a great trip and best wishes for clear skies.

    in reply to: Junocam #15290
    Clive Inglis
    Participant
    Topics: 17
    Replies: 41

    Brilliant Christina!

    in reply to: M42 Processing #14916
    Clive Inglis
    Participant
    Topics: 17
    Replies: 41

    Wow! A superb image. Are you sure you haven’t got anything in orbit? Thanks for sharing it.

    in reply to: National Geographic's top places for dark skies #14311
    Clive Inglis
    Participant
    Topics: 17
    Replies: 41

    Rupert, thanks again for the advice. Thinking about it, the most likely cause of the lens flare in the image was an errant head torch! Thank you for your description on how to use Photoshop to “fix” the flare blotches. Unfortunately I’ve only got GIMP on my computer. If you would be prepared to have a go at improving the image I’d be pleased to let you have a copy of the raw image file.

    However, using GIMP I have able to make the more prominent flare patches less apparent by selecting the circular flared region and using the levels tool to adjust its brightness to match that of the surrounding image.

     

    in reply to: National Geographic's top places for dark skies #14302
    Clive Inglis
    Participant
    Topics: 17
    Replies: 41

    Rupert. Thanks for your words of advice. I haven’t had a chance to use this lens as yet. Perhaps during this weekends observing session on Blackheath. I understand Tej has also purchased a similar lens and I will be interested to hear how he’s getting on with it.

    Perhaps it would more appropriate to start a new thread for my following question but since I’ve already posted the image of the Milky Way earlier in this thread:

    When I got around to processing the raw file of the image above, I noticed some odd circular patches appearing almost in a line across the image. Looking closely at the uncorrected jpeg image above, I see they are present here. I don’t think its dirt on the lens, in the lens or on the camera’s sensor as these patches are not present in subsequent images. However, I did move the camera after this shot. When this shot was taken Venus was very bright and someway off the frame to the lower left. Could these patches be due to lens flare created by Venus? Anyone any thoughts?

     

     

    in reply to: National Geographic's top places for dark skies #14298
    Clive Inglis
    Participant
    Topics: 17
    Replies: 41

    Christina. This article put me on the path to buying a Rokinon lens for my Canon 80D (APS-C) but as I said last night the lens I was hoping to buy, Rokinon 16mm F2.0, was “out of stock” on Amazon and appeared to be only available from the US with a large chunk of import duty which pushed it out of my price range. However, as I explained, I found out this lens is also branded as a Samyang lens and was available on Amazon with no import duty payable.

    One note of caution: The Canon version of this lens does not have a focus confirmation chip. I believe there isn’t a problem with Nikon cameras (??), but it might be worth checking.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 6 months ago by Clive Inglis.
    in reply to: National Geographic's top places for dark skies #14290
    Clive Inglis
    Participant
    Topics: 17
    Replies: 41

    Thanks for your question regarding orientation. If in doubt please adjust your frame of reference by standing on your head.

    in reply to: National Geographic's top places for dark skies #14287
    Clive Inglis
    Participant
    Topics: 17
    Replies: 41

    Thanks Tej. The milky way image was taken near Uluru in the Northern Territories with my old kit lens on my new Canon 80D (30sec 18mm f/4.5), right at the limit for this lens on an undriven mount, hence the recent purchase of the Samyang lens.

    in reply to: National Geographic's top places for dark skies #14282
    Clive Inglis
    Participant
    Topics: 17
    Replies: 41

    A veritable dark sky bucket list. I can vouch for the night skies at Gokyo in the Himalayas although, its a bit of a walk , I wouldn’t recommend the accommodation to those who like their creature comforts and the weather can be a little unpredictable!

    And as for the Australian Outback, unpolluted night skies and a chance to view of the zodiacal light?? (Still working on the raws….. Better put my name down for the next astro-photography workshop.)

     

    in reply to: VLF Preamplifier #13295
    Clive Inglis
    Participant
    Topics: 17
    Replies: 41

    Hi Malcolm,

    Yes, you are correct that the preamp  design I posted is relatively wideband, (at least as far as the VLF transmitter frequencies are concerned) and not selective. I’ve used this feature as in my RPi based VLF receiver I’m interested in receiving across the VLF spectrum. As I demonstrated at the last radio group meeting, the “receiver” is a USB sound card and then I use some python code on the RPi to extract more than one VLF signal after averaging a number of ffts.

    You should still be able to use this preamp to increase your signal level, the “selectivity” being achieved by tuning the resonant frequency of the antenna to your desired transmitter.

    Regarding posting charts over the internet, I believe you could do something  similar using Spectrum Lab which has a set of instructions that might allow you to post charts from the Watch Window . You will have to research this one, as I haven’t tried it from the Watch Window although I’ve had success posting waterfall plots.

    Best of luck.

     

     

     

    in reply to: Weather Station Data #12788
    Clive Inglis
    Participant
    Topics: 17
    Replies: 41

    Hi Mike, just noticed your post on the forum. Good work. Its a shame we couldn’t convince the ROG to setup something similar, or are they somewhere on the map? I was trying to see whether there was a contributor up here on the hill but it appears not.  It would interesting to know how/if the climate up here is that much different from what it is down there.

    in reply to: Clear Skies!…So whats on sky? #12514
    Clive Inglis
    Participant
    Topics: 17
    Replies: 41

    Great images Mike. I particularly like the diffraction patterns around the brighter stars.

    in reply to: Clear Skies!…So whats on sky? #12420
    Clive Inglis
    Participant
    Topics: 17
    Replies: 41

    Hi Guys,

    I had a look this morning around 5am. Couldn’t see anything that might be the comet through binoculars, the proximity of Venus in that part of the sky didn’t help. Took some photographs through my DSLR with  a 200mm lens and I think I can make out a very small faint fuzzy green object that’s in the right place, but its going to take a telescope to resolve anything more. Let’s hope for another clear morning soon!

     

    in reply to: Waning Gibbous Moon on Halloween #12298
    Clive Inglis
    Participant
    Topics: 17
    Replies: 41

    Superb image Tej. So sharp, great contrast. Well captured!

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 40 total)