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Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • in reply to: M81/82 #18564
    ThObitz
    Participant
    Topics: 9
    Replies: 9

    But definitely nice in a super-clear and super-warm summer night!

    in reply to: Milky Way #17982
    ThObitz
    Participant
    Topics: 9
    Replies: 9

    Indeed. You just have to get yourself into a place far enough away from London. 🙂

    BTW, the pictures uploaded before had a tint – this is the right one.

     

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    in reply to: Photographing an eclipse #16465
    ThObitz
    Participant
    Topics: 9
    Replies: 9

    A word of warning – a “normal” neutral density filter will absorb enough light from the sun to be able to take a picture – but you might want to test upfront how hot it gets by that, i.e. what happens if you point it to the sun for an extended period of time. (Apart from that, my B&W ND filters are expensive, and I am not sure whether I want to risk whether they bleach out…)

    The solar filters used in astronomy reflect a large proportion. I personally bought a step ring 77 to 95mm and glued in a Baader film – that looked a bit safer to me.

    Focal length is going to be an issue – few people carry a 600mm lens around, test before how large the sun is on your picture.

    And there’s obviously still going to be a huge contrast between the sun and the world around it – if you want one of these “classics” with the sun over the landscape, you’ll have to take one picture for the sun and one with the landscape.

    Have fun in the US, and enjoy the eclipse (we are going to be at the beaches of South Carolina – will be nice! 🙂 )

    in reply to: National Geographic's top places for dark skies #16164
    ThObitz
    Participant
    Topics: 9
    Replies: 9

    14mm is really wide – the moon is about 60° over the horizon, so the picture reaches from the horizon well over the zenith. Scorpio is visible just underneeth the moon.

    No milky way I am afraid – Singapore must have invented the word light polution. They even have these beams of light from the skyscrapers just for decoration…

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    in reply to: National Geographic's top places for dark skies #16147
    ThObitz
    Participant
    Topics: 9
    Replies: 9

    Hi Christina,

    I am a new member (you may remember my twins from the Venus observation last year).

    Instead of a tracking mount for the camera alone, I just got an adapter to use with my existing Celestron mount – 20 pounds.

    In terms of wide angle – happy to bring my Nikon 14-24 along for one of the next member observation evenings if you want to try that. Can’t make Blackheath this month though as I am travelling.

    Best

    Thomas

    in reply to: Fog on eyepieces #16137
    ThObitz
    Participant
    Topics: 9
    Replies: 9

    Thanks for the excellent advice, both of you! I’ll probably put on the covers and put it into my pocket or under some cover.

    Tej, for the hair dryer I will probably need a bit more power than the 6A I have at the moment, but will give it a try.

    Best

    Thomas

     

    in reply to: Astrophotography: software capture tools for Nikon users #16126
    ThObitz
    Participant
    Topics: 9
    Replies: 9

    Hi Tej,

    Which kind of functionality are you after with a Nikon? For timelapse photography you are just taking pictures in defined intervals – which I can either set up in the camera itself (shooting menue > Interval timer shootings on the D750), or I use an external remote. I am not sure whether Lightroom tethering works together with the interval timer, the alternative is a driver which mounts the camera as a drive to download the pictures.

    Regards

    Thomas

    in reply to: M57 #16124
    ThObitz
    Participant
    Topics: 9
    Replies: 9

    Indeed. 🙂

    in reply to: Refractors vs reflectors #16049
    ThObitz
    Participant
    Topics: 9
    Replies: 9

    I think it is perfectly cool that people buy telescopes without knowing a lot about what to do with them. I also think that goes way beyond the refractor vs reflector decision.

    One of these people sold me his never-used, as-new 9.25 inch Nexstar Evolution with a set of eyepieces last week for about half the price he paid nine months ago. When he set it up to demonstrate everything was working, he complained that the telescope had such a tiny field of view he never was able to spot anything – even using the eyepiece with the shortest focal length. It did not help he mounted the red dot finder the wrong way around.

    It is a really nice telescope. I always wanted one.

    🙂

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)